Amon Duul Reviews Part Ten: Amon Duul II’s “Made in Germany”

Made in Germany Album Cover.

1) Overture; 2) Wir Wollen; 3) Wilhelm Wilhelm; 4) SM II Peng; 5) Elevators Meet Whispering; 6) Metropolis; 7) Lud­wig; 8) The King’s Chocolate Waltz; 9) Blue Grotto; 10) Mr. Kraut’s Jinx; 11) Wide Angle; 12) Three-Eyed Overdrive; 13) Emigrant Song; 14) Loosey Girls; 15) Top Of The Mud; 16) Dreams; 17) Gala Gnome; 18) 5.5.55; 19) La Krautoma; 20) Excessive Spray.

Ten out of Ten

“Amon Duul II” ends their incredible six year, ten album (including “Live in London”) streak with the finest pop album the band ever made and a fine contender for the best pop album made by a former prog band (and a fine contender for a top ten album of the decade, thought it would be rather low on the list(phew!)).

All of the band’s pop experiments pay off fully with an album that displays a band with incredible songwriting depth, superb arranging abilities, amazing chops and a great sense of humor. The “schizo pop” approach of past albums is still here but it’s propped up by a return of arty textures and expansive arrangements. Most importantly, the schizophrenic approach is fully understandable for the first time as the album is tied together with a concept (a brief history of Germany) that makes the schizophrenic approach actually completely vital to the success of the album.

In fact, this album even has a generally good reputation with the band’s older fans as well as critics in general. While many people believed the band was completely going by the wayside due to their directionless (but hilarious) genre experiments, this album seemed to show that the band was making a superb rebound that would last for years to come.

Unfortunately, that rebound only lasted this album as several vitally important band members evaporated into the mist after the release of this album. No matter: no better swan song for the original group could exist but this album. Nobody but completists need worry about the four albums they released in the late 70’s and early 80’s (however, those fans may want to stick around for the 90’s and 00’s).

So what makes this album so great? Let’s start with the sound: the band is nearly fully in short song format with this album. They fit 20 songs two records and one CD. Sure, many of these are short (but evocative) instrumentals. However, even these instrumentals are interesting. Sure, many of the melodies are simple but they are all well written, catchy and meaningful.

Then, there are the arrangements. The band truly pulled out all the stops with this album: although it can generally be called a “pop” album, the songs have art-rock arrangements that bring them up from “pop” songs to “art pop” songs. While this approach can be very stinky (after all, what is Styx but a simplistic pop band with banal art rock arrangements?) here it works because the arrangements are tasteful, creative and always fit in with the mood of the songs.

That, plus the album can seriously serve as a compendum of all “Amon Duul II”s past styles. Sure, their poppy side is more heavily represented. But there hard rock side, balladering side, vaudeville side and even their arty, jammy elements are in full flight. More amazingly, all of these elements seem completely in place on the album: the band never seems to rock for the sake of rocking or art for the sake of arting.

The concept seems to give the band a renewed sense of purpose and focus that helps avoid making their genre jumping reckless. Instead, it seems like the band is pulling off a true “White Album” within a concept album format.

That said, I don’t want to stress the “concept album” appeal too much. This will give you the idea that the album is much, much more serious than it really is in execution. Sure, I do believe the band is serious in that they want to create a brief, but workable history of Germany for the rock world. And I also think they’re serious in creating an entertaining and engaging record.

However, the band doesn’t approach the creation of the concept album as some type of “sacred duty” or “great artistic moment.” Instead, the band often treats it as a goofy laugh. How can an album with a vaudeville track like “Ludwig” be taken too seriously? There’s no way an album with a vaudeville song that authentic and that incredible could be taken too seriously.

Neither could an album with such goofy (but well written) lyrics or an album with funny string arrangements popping up all over the place every other song. Neither can an album with a penultimate track arranged as an interview between an incredibly annoying DJ and a series of clips from Adolph Hitler’s speeches. Especially when said interview includes such dialogue as “Adolph, baby” followed by the DJ asking him for advice on the entertainment business!

That last bit may be offensive to many Germans and I agree it is pushing some buttons. However, it is so silly and non-threatening that only the most easily offended people would truly find it to be a serious flaw in the album.

I realize I didn’t describe too many of the songs on the album. That’s because a) there’s so damn many b) there’s way too diverse and c) it’s best if this album is discovered in real time. It may take a few listens to sink in but I fully believe that any lover of good, diverse and original rock and roll and krautrock in particular will love this album. It shows a fully competent, determined and focused band ready to survive the musical changes on their own terms.

Of course, half the band had to leave after making the album. After this, the dreaded “suckening” begins. I can barely even call it a sell out: more like a complete loss of purpose, followed by desperation and completely confusion. The following four albums sound nothing alike (which is noble) but add nothing to the band’s immaculate reputation.

Luckily, they are mostly out of print and easy to ignore. And yes, I’m going to review them anyways. Give that man a dollar.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

About Culture Fusion Reviews

A multi-effort web review periodical of varied cultural landmarks curated by Eric Benac: freelance writer, journalist, artist, musician, comedian, and 30-ish fellow caught in and trying to make sense of the slipstream of reality.

2 responses to “Amon Duul Reviews Part Ten: Amon Duul II’s “Made in Germany””

  1. Dave says :

    I agree with the 10 out of 10. This is their finest hour. Made In Germany is rapidly becoming one of my ‘desert island discs’. For me, there is nothing bad on the whole album. It is an eclectic mix of so many different styles of music all centred around German history. Highlights for me are Ludwig, Blue Grotto, Gala Gnome…man, listen to the lyrics…fabulous

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: