Amon Duul Review Part Nine: Amon Duul II’s “Hijack”

Hijack Album Cover.

1) Can’t Wait (pt. 1 + pt. 2) / Mirror; 2) Traveller; 3) You’re Not Alone; 4) Explode Like A Star; 5) Da Guadeloop; 6) Lonely Woman; 7) Liquid Whisper; 8) Archy The Robot

Eight out of Ten

“Amon Duul II”s arduous “at least one album a year” schedule results in what many people consider the first truly “bad” album the band ever made. 1974’s “Hi Jack” (or “Hi-jack” or “Hijack”; all titles have been used) goes even further into the realm of pop music schizophrenia. It is perhaps the band’s first truly, completely incoherent album.

Not only is the album completely incoherent, but it occasionally crosses the line from “non-trivially accessible” to “generically accessible.” The band was treading this line for their last several albums and never really crossed the line until this album. For Gods, sake, there is a DISCO SONG ON THIS ALBUM. What other proof needs to be shown that the band is now a completely dirty sell out?

Well, in my opinion a lot more: “Da Guadeloop,” the previously mentioned DISCO SONG isn’t actually a bad attempt at trying out funkier pastures. The band adds a touch of artiness to the sound by bringing in damn near psychedelic sounds. Not only that, but the song is actually catchy and memorable (unlike many bad disco songs). Point being, no genre is inherently awful; there are always some good songs that justify a genre’s existence. Besides, the band wouldn’t truly become “Funky Awful” for a few more albums.

Another song which may hardcore fans may bemoan is the acoustic ballad “You’re Not Alone” (shades of Michael Jackson’s mediocre ballad comes to mind). In fact, this might be the one instance on the album where the band’s voracious attempt to branch out, diversify and accessibilize (pardon me for that made up word) really and truly fails.

I have nothing against simplicity. In fact, I think genial simplicity is MUCH harder to achieve than genial complexity as the song has nothing to hide behind. Complexity can often mask a lack of true musical content. And honestly, that’s what happens with this song: the band does throw on strings, horns and various amounts of keyboards to create a climactic feel for the song.

However, it’s truly a “pig with lipstick” deal as the song features two (count em, two) acoustic chords played over and over. The song never branches out, never progresses. Not even James Taylor at his worst (and I don’t think James Taylor is Satanic) wouldn’t pull such a stupid trick.

Now consider the two songs I’ve described so far: one of them could compete with (better) examples of disco. The other is a sub-sub-sub James Taylor acoustic folk ballad. These two songs represent a quarter of the songs on the album. What chance of coherency does this album possess?

 

Hi Jack! Hi!!!

Answer: none. In fact, this might be the band’s mostly wildly diverse album yet. It isn’t even garnered a sense of “false coherency” created by uniform arrangements. For the first time, the band crafts a set of wildly disconnected arrangement ideas. The arrangements now suit the song instead of suiting the band.

Accusations of “White Album”-ish COULD be levied at this album but should be denied for a few reasons. One, the “White Album” for all its diversity still felt unified and like a coherent, logical statement. It felt like the band was doing something of a “parody” album (not an original idea surrounding that album but the most appropriate). Sure, they were showing off but they were doing it with a nudge and a wink.

Here, though, it seems like the band is throwing shit at the wall to see what sticks. Besides funk and acoustic folk, we have ELO like funky space rock (“Can’t Wait”) odd sci-fi fantasies (the indescribable “Archy the Robot”) and even LOUNGE music with the band’s incredibly bizarre re-arrangement of “Lonely Woman.”

Is this desperation to get a hit (by throwing all sorts of mainstream 70’s genres at the listeners) or is it another example of “Amon Duul II” showing off their ability to entertain with an insanely incoherent, schizophrenic, near pop-masterpiece? I think there’s a bit of truth in both statements: the band was becoming increasingly popular and may have been “giving the listener what they wanted.”

However, I find that hard to believe given that a) these songs are still crafted with the care that “Amon Duul II” had crafted their previous “schizophrenic pop albums” and b) I can’t imagine any of these songs being sizable hits. Sure, most of them hit on basic 70’s genres, but they are tweaked enough to remind the listener that this was the band that released “Tanz Der Lemming” a mere THREE years ago (talk about progress!).

Basically, this comes in the band’s total mastery of arrangement and playing. The arrangements may be more typical of each song’s genre specification but each is still total “Amon Duul.” What other band would record a garage rock tune like “Traveller” to be so spacey? Who in their right mind would consider giving said song to Renate, thereby rendering it completely incompatible with rock radio?

Only “Amon Duul II” of course. Basically, this is another fine album in the band’s “schizophrenic pop” album series. Sure, it’s a bit more “generic” compared to past albums and it enters a level of incoherency the band had only hinted at before. But each song (besides the aforementioned acoustic ballad) are well written, catchy and incredibly memorable (as “catchy” and “memorable” don’t always walk hand in hand, a distinction which separates top rate pop bands such as “ABBA” from mere professionals such as “The Bay City Rollers).

However, it’s not hard to see why many fans and critics consider this such a low point. In a certain sense, it is the band’s low point thus far: the lack of coherency and increasing genericism do reek of desperation. The band had progressed so far in only a few years that they were completely incompatible with their previous sound (incredible considering most of the band members remained from the classic line-up).

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About Culture Fusion Reviews

A multi-effort web review periodical of varied cultural landmarks curated by Eric Benac: freelance writer, journalist, artist, musician, comedian, and 30-ish fellow caught in and trying to make sense of the slipstream of reality.

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