Tag Archive | 60′s and 70′s rock

Holding a Dance Party with MC Cartney!

If there’s anybody that knows anything about dance music, it’s Paul McCartney.

Clearly a man who knows what it means to dance. Courtesy Strange Cosmos

While it looks like his boy toy dance partner has two left feet, Paul has consistently shown he has a great ear for music that gets you on your feet and, to paraphrase George Harrison, “shaking your ass.”

So, when it comes time to create a dance mix you can trust, it’s obviously time to turn to MC Cartney himself. Paul’s career spans a whole bunch of crap, from hard core dance tunes, to rockabilly, to silly love songs, “Silly Love Songs,” synthesizer experiments, classical waltzes, and beautiful ballads.

Honestly, you could make a tub thumpin’ dance mix from his first 10 solo albums alone. However, we’re going full career spanning here, simply to maximize potential annoyance. And no Beatles: that’s too easy.

(I apologize for the mean spirited Linda McCartney joke: she was a lovely person, with a warm heart, real photographic skill and pretty.)

1. “Dance Tonight.”

Perhaps this comes across as a little cloddishly obvious: after all, the word DANCE is right there in the title. But hey, it’s catchy, I like the guitar solo and it’s so charmingly freaking PAUL that I can’t help but love it.

Besides, it’s kind of a nice warm up to later block-rocking-beats: the tone is low key, laid back, and rather chill. And if you’re more inspired to do the Charleston than you are the Dougie, that’s just fine. We’ll wait for you to stop.

2. “Transpirtual Stomp”

Raise your hands if you knew Paul did an acid house album. For those of you who have your hands up, kick yourself right in the arse because that was a trick question. Paul didn’t do an acid house album: Youth did in 1993, when he took samples from Paul’s superb “Off the Ground” and created “Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest” nine tracks of long, relatively throwaway electronic music that asks one question: do you know bogey music?”

3. “Bogey Music”

Because Paul certainly did! Get out your air vocoder, because we’re getting stupid! Ah, the early 80’s! Was there a more fun time to own a whole bank of synthesizers? During this period, Paul said “what the hell, I’m game” and tried his hand at creating some form of nascent synth pop.

Did it work? Sure! I definitely want to bogey after hearing this flawless masterpiece. The Sistine Chapel’s got nothing on getting down and dirty with the bogey!.

See also: “Dark Room” from the album album, “McCartney II: The Synthening.”

4. “Run Devil Run”

Oh my! Listen to those shouts! Paul is ready to kick down the door of artistic credibility by slamming together his own rockabilly standard. After two (or three, if you delved into “Dark Room”) songs of electronic trance strum und drang, it’s refreshing to hear an old-fashioned “shake yer hips” style dance tune. Your parents probably danced to songs like this the night they conceived you. GET INTO IT.

5. “Maybe I’m Amazed”

By now, your blood should be pumping. For many elderly MC Cartney fans, that’s not a good thing: it could mean they are close to a serious coronary infraction.That’s why we’re going to slow it down a bit with this jam.

It’s cliched as all hell, but what can I say? The song still works. So, let your favorite lover out of their lock box, stand cheek to cheek, and slow dance the night away.

6. “Spiral”

So, “Maybe I’m Amazed” didn’t slow your heart rate enough? You’re still gasping for air? All right, let’s take a dance party break to avoid a true party foul heart attack. While you relax, listen to this piece of pseudo-classical nonsense. I won’t turn it off until you start dancing again. That should get you going.

7. “Rock Show”

Yeah! Put those lighters in the air! Whistle to the main synthesizer melody. And then get ready to grind, grind, grind on your favorite scratching post. What the hell did any of that mean? Who cares! MC Cartney is in the room.

Paul goes glam without make up and tames the genre to his rules by making everything as bogey as humanely possible. Or as lush. I get the two confused from time to time.

8. “Silly Love Songs”

Every dance party needs to have the “sell out” song that everyone outwardly hates, but secretly loves. This is that song. SHAKE YOUR ASS.

9. “Monkberry Moon Delight”

After that silly little frothy cash cow, it’s time to stomp your feet to something a bit weirder. Yet still danceable. Can’t you just imagine doing some variation of the “two-step shuffle” to this glorious little ditty? I know I certainly can: because I certainly AM. Let it all hang out.

(See also: “Let it All Hang Out”)

10. “Another Day”

It’s the end of the dance party. Everyone is worn out: they’ve danced to their ultimate limit. It’s time to ride out into the sunset and to celebrate…that’s right, the rise of a new day sun.

What better way to float away than nodding off to this feather-weight ditty? Just imagine the credits are rolling on your own private movie: it works better that way.

Well, that’s it. Hopefully, you danced so hard your pants fell off. Or at least you got wacky enough to put a lampshade on your head. Yeah. I hope that happened!

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Inexplicable Albums: The Grateful Dead’s “Infrared Roses”

What a long strange trip…

You know what? I’m not going to throw down that hoary old quote like it’s some beatific mantra that distills the essence of life into seven simple words. It’s a petty and banal way to start a review and I won’t stand for own laziness. Especially as this is, indeed, my first review after a two-year break.

And, of course, I decide to review the Grateful Dead for some reason. And not only a Grateful Dead album: but one that has no recognizable songs and is, instead, edited together as one long continuous suite of keyboard noise, bass thumps, drum paradiddles and guitar scrapes.

What a way to reintroduce myself to the reviewing world! Indeed, what a long strange trip…

It’s been so long since I reviewed anything that my fans are likely unaware that I went and did something incredibly stupid and ill-advised: I became a Grateful Dead fan.

It started out small: just a single live album, “Live/Dead.” Then some MP3’s. Then all the studio albums… right now, as I type, I’m plotting how to afford the next massive multi-concert box set they’re sure to release soon. After all, who doesn’t need 17,000 variations of “Sugaree”?

How did this happen?

The Grateful Dead have a way of working their way into your mind and your musical sphere. Their songs are pleasant, melodic, harmonious, well-played and varied. They have pretty good lyrics. Sometimes their songs are excellent. They’re almost always good.

But then you listen to a live album. And it clicks: Jerry starts soloing, Phil starts zooming, Bob starts chicka-chicking, whichever soon-to-be-dead keyboard player they had was tinkling and the double drummers were thumping.

And off you went, on some musical adventure! Sometimes it really sucked, but it was usually listenable. Sometimes it was transcendent.

Jazz in a rock format.

Not jazz rock. Not fusion. But rock (and roots music) played as if it was jazz. Nothing quite like it.

Another reason the band is so addicting is due to what I call the “Walt Whitman” effect: so much of them, and all so luscious. Because the band was constantly up to…something. There was always some kind of music they were working on or a side band with which they were jamming.

Simply put, they released a ton of studio albums (better than most people think), recorded almost all their shows and had baffling solo careers that veered from Grateful Dead stylization straight up into funk, jazz and even mainstream AOR.

Jerry probably did the best: his literally all-solo self-titled album is a winner and one that that mixed folk songs with avant-guard noise. He also had a collection of standards with an orchestra, helped invent modern bluegrass and toured with his own band (imaginatively titled “The Jerry Garcia Band”) when the Dead wasn’t.

And Weir released a handful of solo albums (including the classic “Ace”) and  was in half a dozen different bands that often released only one album before he got bored and wandered away. The best of these is probably “RatDog” which takes the Dead jam aesthetic and slams it into Weir’s surprisingly complex songwriting.

However, no record produced in the band’s camp (be it a Dead release or a solo album) was as strange as “Infrared Roses,” beyond, perhaps John Oswald’s legendary Plunderphonic “Gray Folded.” But that’s a topic for a different time.

“Infrared Roses” is a collection of the “space” and “drum” sections that started appearing in the band’s concerts in the 80’s and 90’s. These sections took the place of the standard “Dark Star” sonic explorations in the 60’s and 70’s, popped up at any time during a concert and were easily the most “out there” moments of the band’s decline.

For some reason (I’m not near my copy and am not willing to look it up for religious reasons), the band decided they would edit some of the best sections together and release it as an album. The producer (again, blanking on his name) skillfully slapped together weird jams and noise making and made it sound like…weird jams and noise making. For about an hour.

Such a description is, likely, very uninviting. In fact, this was the second Grateful Dead album I ever owned and it was quite a shock to hear what often sounded like harsh industrial synthesizers droning into a near Amon Duul II-type soundscape. Where the hell was “Uncle John’s Band”?

Probably playing to the time in a different dimension.

After the initial terror of the album wears off, it becomes surprisingly listenable and even diverse. Sometimes, it’s just Billy and Mickey locked into some interminable drum groove.

Other moments, it’s Jerry soloing dissonantly while Phil lets his bass feedback.

Occasionally, Michael McDonald look and soundalike Brett Myland runs his hands across the keyboard aimlessly while Bob Weir screws around with ridiculous midi sounds.

After awhile, the mind starts focusing in on the little details. That’s the secret of Grateful Dead jams: they go on so long that your brain starts focusing on the small things, picking apart weird little details and entertaining itself with moments it might not have noticed otherwise.

It’s very intuitive and, at its finest, something like meditation: that is, focusing your attention on something so fully that you grasp its essence intuitively.

Or maybe it’s just a bunch of noises. Could go either way. And don’t get your hopes up for a big epic solo or crescendo. After an hour, ust kind of ends after what seems like an eternity spent listening to the band make goofy noises for an hour.

But hey, it’s a journey that beats Journey, a long strange trip that beats “Strange Brew” and a noise rock experiment from a band that was square enough to regularly cover (the sublime) Marty Robbins.

So, it’s pretty epic.

Amon Duul Reviews Part Thirteen: Amon Duul II’s “Only Human”

Only Human Album Cover.

1) Another Morning; 2) Don’t Turn To Stone; 3) Kirk Morgan; 4) Spaniards And Spacemen; 5) Kismet; 6) Pharao; 7) Ruby Lane.

2 out of 10

As if “Almost Alive” wasn’t embarrassing enough, the band had to make one last stab at commercial relevancy with this 1978 album. Of course, it was artistically, critically and commercially a complete failure. But it did serve a useful purpose: it helped put an end to this ailing band, which had gone from one of the best of the 70’s into one of the most bland and useless.

But what band is this? Is this the same band that recorded “”Phallus Dei” in 1969? Of course not: the only original member was Chris Karrer, never the most prolific of the band’s songwriters. So the rest of the band continues to provide most of the musical content, coming up intensely short once again.

It’s not as if the band didn’t try. They throw in some funkiness, ala “Another Morning.” Spanish motifs are expanded upon at some length, as are middle Eastern styles and even disco. The band also attempts softer and harder rock styles. The band even infuses them with the same type of “arty” arrangements they had attempted on past albums.

One would think with all this work to create an exciting, diverse and rich sonic atmosphere would not have gone to such a complete waste. But the arrangements here simply don’t work. It is, once again, a pig in lipstick situation. The songs are completely unmemorable, non-catchy and borderline completely poorly written. “Another Morning” sounds like the band wanted to be ABBA. But ABBA only worked because they had genius composers: nobody in this band is a genius.

The arrangements also stay stuck in a rather frustratingly early 70’s art rock style that is completely out of place in the era of punk. For God’s sake, the Ramones had been out almost two years by this point! Post punk and new wave bands were already using synthesizers in new and startling ways. The band did wisely avoid trying to adapt to these styles but simply fail in their old styles over and over again.

Basically, the band simply comes up completely short on material that is worth hearing. The album isn’t terrifying to listen to (no THRAKATTAK or Metal Machine Music dissonance here). But it goes in one ear and out the other. If the band was writing good material, catchy, memorable songs their slight “outdatedness” would be compensated by great songs. But the band couldn’t adapt to the time and couldn’t even represent their own time well.

“Only Human” indeed. Only too good the band broke up at this point. Their story doesn’t end here though: poorly thought out reunions await us in the next few reviews.

PS Sorry this album is so short but there’s only so many ways you can write “the songs suck and the band is completely out of date” without repeating yourself. And I insist, an album that is simply one of the blandest albums ever (NOTHING stands out) doesn’t deserve a truly in depth, mocking review.

Amon Duul Reviews Part Twelve: Amon Duul II’s “Almost Alive…And Feeling Fine”

What the hell?!

1) One Blue Morning; 2) Good Bye My Love; 3) Ain’t Today Tomorrow’s Yesterday; 4) Hallelujah; 5) Feeling Un­easy; 6) Live In Jericho.

4 out of 10

“Amon Duul II” continue their slide into complete irrelevancy with this album. The line-up had stabilized around the same line-up that produced “Pyragony X” the year before. Naturally, the sound of the album has changed considerably. For that reason, “Amon Dull II” can be slightly praised. But the point they gained for the unpredictable change of their sound is lost by…the change of their sound.

The album brings in a few more outside sources into the band’s sound, none of which are good. Gone are the attempts at boogying and bluesing. Instead, the band seems to want to compete with…Parliament. Yes, the band suddenly decided their new direction was going to include funk. Seriously.

This helps explain the lower number of songs: increased running time. However, this isn’t generally because the band is exploring multiple moods, melodies and complex structures. No, the band is “grooving” as much as it pains me to say it. The band almost becomes disco at various points throughout the album.

A fan of the band (and of art rock in general) may argue “wouldn’t you rather hear Amon Duul II do funk and disco, as opposed to Parliament or the Bee Gees?” No way: the style of funk here is way too stiff, way too “white” (yes, compared even to the Bee Gees) to actually syncopate well enough to be catchy and exciting.

Songs like “Hallelujah,” “One Blue Morning” and “Good Bye My Love” simply don’t work. They last way, way too long and explore too few ideas. To compensate for their lack of funk chops, the band seems to bring in an atmosphere of arena rock (of all things!) instead the sound. Imagine that: combining, say, Foreigner, with the hot new sounds of Donna Summer. Just imagine it. Let it sink in your mind for a few moments before attempting to track down this album.

When the band isn’t trying to make you dance, they’re trying to make you “feel” which may actually be a much scarier proposition for the band with this new sound. “Ain’t Today Tomorrow’s Yesterday,” hideous title aside, is the band trying to create a great progressive rock ballad. In 1977. How embarrassing. And it’s completely a triumph of style of substance: wild pianos, strings, choirs, synthesizers, epic vocals and ecstatic guitar solos are all simply a case of a pig in lipstick of the song’s melodic potential.

“Feeling Uneasy” isn’t nearly as pompous but should hardly be mentioned. In the past, the band could have enlivened the song with a dark atmosphere, odd instrumental textures and a dramatic, operatic performance from Renate. Here, it chumps along until its over, no emotions having been touched and no melodies having been implanted into the brain.

Old school fans may get their rocks off to “Live in Jericho” as it is 12 minutes long and finds the band trying to improvise. However, this version of the band simply lacks the chemistry to make this truly compelling. Would the original band have featured a drum solo in any song (correct me if I’m wrong) let alone START A TRACK WITH ONE? The keyboard and guitar solos are barely worth mentioning; the former masters of atmospheric jamming sound more like a bad jazz fusion group, trying to out Jeff Jeff Beck. Beck was never this self indulgent.

This album is a major drop off from “Pyragony X” in every single way. Sure, the songs are longer and the structures and melodies are more complex and less generic. But the melodies, structures and arrangements aren’t even catchy, let alone memorable. The atmosphere of the album couldn’t sound less artificial if it tried. “Almost Alive” is a perfect title for an album that seems to want to soar but which can’t even get its feet off the ground.

Who in this band thought combining generic arena rock with stiff white funk would help sell more records? I mean at this point that’s really the only goal they could have had right? The band didn’t actually think this junk was artistically valid did they?

I find it hard to believe that the band had released an album as great as “Made in Germany” only two years before this one astonishing. Yes, there were band member changes but the majority of the band stayed. This can only mean the band had suffered a complete loss of taste and decency that was basically permanent.

And you know what? It even gets worse with the next album: say what you will about the last two albums but they were hardly completely generic. The next album goes that route with bad songwriting and embarrassing arrangement atrocities.

Amon Duul Reviews Part Eleven: Amon Duul II’s “Pyragony X”

Pyragony X album cover.

1) Flower Of The Orient; 2) Merlin; 3) Crystal Hexagram; 4) Lost In Space; 5) Sally The Seducer; 6) Telly Vision; 7) The Only Thing; 8) Capuccino.

Six Out of Ten

Well, it finally happened: after six incredible years and 10 great albums, “Amon Duul II” finally lost it.: “Pyragony X” (or “Pyr Agony X” as it is sometimes called) is the first bad album by the band. The fact is not shocking in and of itself: with so many great albums under their belt, it’s no surprise that the band would start to lose some quality.

However, after the incredible “Made in Germany” this particular album is an incredible disappointment. It’s not exactly “pure agony” as the title suggests: instead, it continues the streamling of the previous albums but does so in a much less engaging, diverse and unique fashion. They seem to hit on a bit of a roots rock fetishism here. Barroom boogies make a prominent appearance, as does country rock, blues and even southern rock.

True, the band had never really traveled down this road before so it could be considered a positive point in favor of the band’s experimentation and desire to branch out. In fact, this album does sound like nothing else the band did before or later. This fact gives it a sympathy point but no more.

Part of the problem here was a loss of band members: bass player Lothar Meid finally left the group, taking with him several other members including Renate. As much as I believe there was no real “leader” of “Amon Duul II” I think losing Meid crippled the band. He was the closest thing band had to a true musical leader and songwriter.

Many of the great ideas from past albums, including “Made in Germany” (including the basic song structures, basic melodies and all the orchestral, horn and choir arrangements) came from Meid’s mind. Yes, the other band members contributed their own song ideas and helped flesh out Meid’s arrangements with their own clever ideas. However, with Meid gone, many of those great ideas evaporate, leaving a confused and directionless band to grapple in the dark.

Losing Renate may not have been as big of a deal in a songwriting fashion (as she was never prolific in that regard) or even vocally (as she was contributing less and less) but more psychologically. Renate was one of the main founding members of the original band. Her visionary sounding “acid opera” vocal style helped give “Amon Duul II” a signature stamp of uniqueness that, even when they under utilized her talents (which they always did) made them stand out from other krautrock (or rock bands in general) too cowardly to use wild, out of control female singing.

New band members, bass player Klaus Ebert and keyboard player Stefan Zauner are perfectly solid additions to the line up instrumentally. However, they bring with them none of the fire, experimentalism and creative zest of the players they were replacing. New bass player Ebert did bring many new songwriting ideas to the table in a way that made him the new “idea” guy.

Of course, long term members such as Karrer and Weinzierl were contributing their own ideas to this and past albums. They were great as arrangers, players and “idea thickeners.” However, they simply didn’t have the true songwriting genius of Meid. This problem led to them relying more on Ebert and even Zauner to create the backbones for the songs on this and future albums.

This wouldn’t have been a huge, distracting problem if Ebert and Zauner were highly talented. They are, unfortunately, not. It’s not that the songs on this album are truly bad. It’s obvious that a lot of care went into creating them and that they were arranged to the fullest of the band’s capabilities at the time. In fact, the album even tries going for the “schizophrenic pop” sound of past albums by being as diverse as possible with a variety of catchy, memorable and (potentially) wildly original pop tunes.

“Flower of the Orient” lives up to its name with a light oriental sound weaving throughout the piece. “Merlin” is a catchy piece of space blues that somewhat justifies its name. Other genres include hard driving southern rock (with appropriate attempts at trying to out Dickey Betts) and even spacey instrumental work that suggests a more experimental mind set.

Another great is that the album also avoids falling into genres the band had no hope of succeeding in; the band doesn’t try to play like a punk band nor do they de-evolve into generic synthesized disco schlock (emulating ABBA would have been an awful idea for this band as much as I love ABBA). The band understands what they are capable of doing and stick to this (a situation that would disappear in subsequent albums).

The problem with the album doesn’t lie in its intentions (which are not bad) but in the execution. The eastern and oriental elements mentioned in “Flower of the Orient” end up being incredibly trite, contributing very little to the song. “Merlin” features wild solos which are nowhere near as wild and exciting as necessary to enliven such a generic piece of space blues. All of their attempts to be diverse are smothered by lumpy arrangements which are technically thick but which make every song sound the same, regardless of the genre the band is tackling.

Yes, I realize I highly praised albums such as “Viva La Trance” as being highly diverse, unpredictable and entertaining while at the same time lightly complaining about slightly uniform arrangements. That is a problem on all of the band’s “schizophrenic pop” albums. It is incredibly harmful here because a) these songs are a) nowhere near as strong as the songs on those albums b) the arrangements on the past albums were at least unique to the band.

On albums like “Utopia” and “Hi Jack” the band may have used a somewhat uniform arrangement style but it was THEIR arrangement style. It was a style that was uniquely “Amon Duul II” and it helped the material stand out from standard, banal pop songs of the day. Here, the arrangements could have come from any half competent pop rock band with a slight experimental streak. The band has completely lost its original arrangement style.

Again, this wouldn’t be a major problem if the songs were anywhere near as good as past albums. Unfortunately, they are not. The songs are hardly bad (or else this album would get a rating similar to the ratings the next couple are going to get) as they often feature catchy melodic ideas. But, as mentioned in previous albums, there is a huge difference between “catchy” and “memorable.”

“Catchy” song ideas stick in your head while the song plays but slowly fade away. At some point in your life, one of these catchy ideas will emerge from deep within your mind to haunt and torture you until you hear the song again. “Memorable” song ideas are catchy because of an nontrivial melodic approach that takes catchy ideas and twists them in unique ways that can never be forgotten.

The band really never ventures into “memorable” here, except for perhaps with the instrumental “Crystal Hexagram,” the one song that is usually pointed out as a classic. This guitar based instrumental features some of the best dual guitar interplay of the band’s career, building to several moody climaxes in a way that mirrors their best work. I wouldn’t say the album’s worth hunting down for this track alone (as it’s not as good as all of that and these “Amon Duul II” albums are hard to track down and expensive) but it definitely helps gain the album a point.

Low points include song titles such as “Sally the Seducer” (UGH) and “Telly Vision” (seriously?!) two ultra banal songs that feature shallow melodies, arrangements and subjects. Funny how an anti-commercial song like “Telly Vision” would emerge on the band’s least unique, most commercial sounding album yet. Perhaps the band is trying to make up for the album’s commercial nature by showing their fans they are still anti-establishment and edgy. If so, the band is practicing a nearly dangerous level of self deception.

Beyond these absolutely awful songs, the rest of the album is competently written, non-offensive and absolutely boring generic semi-space-pop-rock that aims for a diverse and experimental sound but which fails completely. The band would seemingly have nowhere else to go but up after this album. However, the band completely nose dives into pure shit with the next two albums in a way that makes “Pyragony X” a late career HIGHLIGHT in retrospect. Be afeared kids.

Amon Duul Reviews Part Ten: Amon Duul II’s “Made in Germany”

Made in Germany Album Cover.

1) Overture; 2) Wir Wollen; 3) Wilhelm Wilhelm; 4) SM II Peng; 5) Elevators Meet Whispering; 6) Metropolis; 7) Lud­wig; 8) The King’s Chocolate Waltz; 9) Blue Grotto; 10) Mr. Kraut’s Jinx; 11) Wide Angle; 12) Three-Eyed Overdrive; 13) Emigrant Song; 14) Loosey Girls; 15) Top Of The Mud; 16) Dreams; 17) Gala Gnome; 18) 5.5.55; 19) La Krautoma; 20) Excessive Spray.

Ten out of Ten

“Amon Duul II” ends their incredible six year, ten album (including “Live in London”) streak with the finest pop album the band ever made and a fine contender for the best pop album made by a former prog band (and a fine contender for a top ten album of the decade, thought it would be rather low on the list(phew!)).

All of the band’s pop experiments pay off fully with an album that displays a band with incredible songwriting depth, superb arranging abilities, amazing chops and a great sense of humor. The “schizo pop” approach of past albums is still here but it’s propped up by a return of arty textures and expansive arrangements. Most importantly, the schizophrenic approach is fully understandable for the first time as the album is tied together with a concept (a brief history of Germany) that makes the schizophrenic approach actually completely vital to the success of the album.

In fact, this album even has a generally good reputation with the band’s older fans as well as critics in general. While many people believed the band was completely going by the wayside due to their directionless (but hilarious) genre experiments, this album seemed to show that the band was making a superb rebound that would last for years to come.

Unfortunately, that rebound only lasted this album as several vitally important band members evaporated into the mist after the release of this album. No matter: no better swan song for the original group could exist but this album. Nobody but completists need worry about the four albums they released in the late 70’s and early 80’s (however, those fans may want to stick around for the 90’s and 00’s).

So what makes this album so great? Let’s start with the sound: the band is nearly fully in short song format with this album. They fit 20 songs two records and one CD. Sure, many of these are short (but evocative) instrumentals. However, even these instrumentals are interesting. Sure, many of the melodies are simple but they are all well written, catchy and meaningful.

Then, there are the arrangements. The band truly pulled out all the stops with this album: although it can generally be called a “pop” album, the songs have art-rock arrangements that bring them up from “pop” songs to “art pop” songs. While this approach can be very stinky (after all, what is Styx but a simplistic pop band with banal art rock arrangements?) here it works because the arrangements are tasteful, creative and always fit in with the mood of the songs.

That, plus the album can seriously serve as a compendum of all “Amon Duul II”s past styles. Sure, their poppy side is more heavily represented. But there hard rock side, balladering side, vaudeville side and even their arty, jammy elements are in full flight. More amazingly, all of these elements seem completely in place on the album: the band never seems to rock for the sake of rocking or art for the sake of arting.

The concept seems to give the band a renewed sense of purpose and focus that helps avoid making their genre jumping reckless. Instead, it seems like the band is pulling off a true “White Album” within a concept album format.

That said, I don’t want to stress the “concept album” appeal too much. This will give you the idea that the album is much, much more serious than it really is in execution. Sure, I do believe the band is serious in that they want to create a brief, but workable history of Germany for the rock world. And I also think they’re serious in creating an entertaining and engaging record.

However, the band doesn’t approach the creation of the concept album as some type of “sacred duty” or “great artistic moment.” Instead, the band often treats it as a goofy laugh. How can an album with a vaudeville track like “Ludwig” be taken too seriously? There’s no way an album with a vaudeville song that authentic and that incredible could be taken too seriously.

Neither could an album with such goofy (but well written) lyrics or an album with funny string arrangements popping up all over the place every other song. Neither can an album with a penultimate track arranged as an interview between an incredibly annoying DJ and a series of clips from Adolph Hitler’s speeches. Especially when said interview includes such dialogue as “Adolph, baby” followed by the DJ asking him for advice on the entertainment business!

That last bit may be offensive to many Germans and I agree it is pushing some buttons. However, it is so silly and non-threatening that only the most easily offended people would truly find it to be a serious flaw in the album.

I realize I didn’t describe too many of the songs on the album. That’s because a) there’s so damn many b) there’s way too diverse and c) it’s best if this album is discovered in real time. It may take a few listens to sink in but I fully believe that any lover of good, diverse and original rock and roll and krautrock in particular will love this album. It shows a fully competent, determined and focused band ready to survive the musical changes on their own terms.

Of course, half the band had to leave after making the album. After this, the dreaded “suckening” begins. I can barely even call it a sell out: more like a complete loss of purpose, followed by desperation and completely confusion. The following four albums sound nothing alike (which is noble) but add nothing to the band’s immaculate reputation.

Luckily, they are mostly out of print and easy to ignore. And yes, I’m going to review them anyways. Give that man a dollar.

Amon Duul Review Part Nine: Amon Duul II’s “Hijack”

Hijack Album Cover.

1) Can’t Wait (pt. 1 + pt. 2) / Mirror; 2) Traveller; 3) You’re Not Alone; 4) Explode Like A Star; 5) Da Guadeloop; 6) Lonely Woman; 7) Liquid Whisper; 8) Archy The Robot

Eight out of Ten

“Amon Duul II”s arduous “at least one album a year” schedule results in what many people consider the first truly “bad” album the band ever made. 1974’s “Hi Jack” (or “Hi-jack” or “Hijack”; all titles have been used) goes even further into the realm of pop music schizophrenia. It is perhaps the band’s first truly, completely incoherent album.

Not only is the album completely incoherent, but it occasionally crosses the line from “non-trivially accessible” to “generically accessible.” The band was treading this line for their last several albums and never really crossed the line until this album. For Gods, sake, there is a DISCO SONG ON THIS ALBUM. What other proof needs to be shown that the band is now a completely dirty sell out?

Well, in my opinion a lot more: “Da Guadeloop,” the previously mentioned DISCO SONG isn’t actually a bad attempt at trying out funkier pastures. The band adds a touch of artiness to the sound by bringing in damn near psychedelic sounds. Not only that, but the song is actually catchy and memorable (unlike many bad disco songs). Point being, no genre is inherently awful; there are always some good songs that justify a genre’s existence. Besides, the band wouldn’t truly become “Funky Awful” for a few more albums.

Another song which may hardcore fans may bemoan is the acoustic ballad “You’re Not Alone” (shades of Michael Jackson’s mediocre ballad comes to mind). In fact, this might be the one instance on the album where the band’s voracious attempt to branch out, diversify and accessibilize (pardon me for that made up word) really and truly fails.

I have nothing against simplicity. In fact, I think genial simplicity is MUCH harder to achieve than genial complexity as the song has nothing to hide behind. Complexity can often mask a lack of true musical content. And honestly, that’s what happens with this song: the band does throw on strings, horns and various amounts of keyboards to create a climactic feel for the song.

However, it’s truly a “pig with lipstick” deal as the song features two (count em, two) acoustic chords played over and over. The song never branches out, never progresses. Not even James Taylor at his worst (and I don’t think James Taylor is Satanic) wouldn’t pull such a stupid trick.

Now consider the two songs I’ve described so far: one of them could compete with (better) examples of disco. The other is a sub-sub-sub James Taylor acoustic folk ballad. These two songs represent a quarter of the songs on the album. What chance of coherency does this album possess?

 

Hi Jack! Hi!!!

Answer: none. In fact, this might be the band’s mostly wildly diverse album yet. It isn’t even garnered a sense of “false coherency” created by uniform arrangements. For the first time, the band crafts a set of wildly disconnected arrangement ideas. The arrangements now suit the song instead of suiting the band.

Accusations of “White Album”-ish COULD be levied at this album but should be denied for a few reasons. One, the “White Album” for all its diversity still felt unified and like a coherent, logical statement. It felt like the band was doing something of a “parody” album (not an original idea surrounding that album but the most appropriate). Sure, they were showing off but they were doing it with a nudge and a wink.

Here, though, it seems like the band is throwing shit at the wall to see what sticks. Besides funk and acoustic folk, we have ELO like funky space rock (“Can’t Wait”) odd sci-fi fantasies (the indescribable “Archy the Robot”) and even LOUNGE music with the band’s incredibly bizarre re-arrangement of “Lonely Woman.”

Is this desperation to get a hit (by throwing all sorts of mainstream 70’s genres at the listeners) or is it another example of “Amon Duul II” showing off their ability to entertain with an insanely incoherent, schizophrenic, near pop-masterpiece? I think there’s a bit of truth in both statements: the band was becoming increasingly popular and may have been “giving the listener what they wanted.”

However, I find that hard to believe given that a) these songs are still crafted with the care that “Amon Duul II” had crafted their previous “schizophrenic pop albums” and b) I can’t imagine any of these songs being sizable hits. Sure, most of them hit on basic 70’s genres, but they are tweaked enough to remind the listener that this was the band that released “Tanz Der Lemming” a mere THREE years ago (talk about progress!).

Basically, this comes in the band’s total mastery of arrangement and playing. The arrangements may be more typical of each song’s genre specification but each is still total “Amon Duul.” What other band would record a garage rock tune like “Traveller” to be so spacey? Who in their right mind would consider giving said song to Renate, thereby rendering it completely incompatible with rock radio?

Only “Amon Duul II” of course. Basically, this is another fine album in the band’s “schizophrenic pop” album series. Sure, it’s a bit more “generic” compared to past albums and it enters a level of incoherency the band had only hinted at before. But each song (besides the aforementioned acoustic ballad) are well written, catchy and incredibly memorable (as “catchy” and “memorable” don’t always walk hand in hand, a distinction which separates top rate pop bands such as “ABBA” from mere professionals such as “The Bay City Rollers).

However, it’s not hard to see why many fans and critics consider this such a low point. In a certain sense, it is the band’s low point thus far: the lack of coherency and increasing genericism do reek of desperation. The band had progressed so far in only a few years that they were completely incompatible with their previous sound (incredible considering most of the band members remained from the classic line-up).